You probably have heard the term “Mexican rice”. What makes Mexican? Well, the answer is very simple. The rice is sauteed first with all the ingredients. Corn, potatoes, peas and carrots until the rice starts popping like popcorn. Then, a mix of blended fresh tomato, bay leaves, cumin, salt, onion and water is strained over it. After all this, just proceed to cook it normally.

The hardest part of cooking chopped red cabbage is the chopping. Carefully add the oil to the preheated pan and add fresh pepper. Mine contains chopped fennel and cabbage. After getting some caramelization on my mix, I added fresh chopped tomatoes. Nice colors ah? 

BLACK BEANS WITH EPAZOTE AND BAY LEAVES

So I chopped fresh epazote and together with sunflower oil and a bay leaf my black beans were ready to go on their cooking journey.

History And Lore

Epazote (chenopodium ambrosioides) was brought to Europe in the 17th century from Mexico and used in various traditional medicines. The herb was used by the Aztecs as a medicine as well as a culinary herb.

Read more from GourmetSleuth.com: http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/articles/detail/epazote#ixzz4ALnMTV00

About Epazote

epazote leafEpazote is a herb well-known to Mexican and Caribbean cooking. The name comes from the Aztec (Nahuatl) epazotl. It is also known as pigweed or Mexican tea and is frequently regarded as a garden pest. It is most commonly used in black bean recipes to ward off some of the “negative” side effects of eating beans. Much like cilantro, it is referred to as an “acquired taste”. The herb is quite pungent and some say it smells like gasoline or kerosene.

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